December 16, 2020

Christmas Lights

My neighborhood is one of those that is lit up at Christmas. It's almost a competitive event, as each house and yard look absolutely beautiful from mid-November through the first week of January.

I have a block wall that borders the street. Along that block wall I string about ninety feet of blinking lights. A few days ago I was working on the lights when I cut right through them. Ninety feet of lighting became forty-five feet of workable lights and a gaping wall of darkness.

Unacceptable.

Off to the big box brands to solve the problem. On December 14. With a mask on. 

Home Depot was no longer selling Christmas lights ... just a small amount of clearance items.

Lowes was no longer selling Christmas lights ... just a small amount of clearance items.

Ace Hardware was no longer selling Christmas lights ... just a small amount of clearance items.

Amazon referred me to third parties who sold my lights ... they were sold out.

This is how Commodity Commerce works. They "have" to get that stuff out of the store because it doesn't sell well ... there aren't enough morons like me who cut through four strands of copper for Commodity Commerce to generate a profit. They need to sell through stuff and generate acceptable inventory turns.

The Performance Commerce brand finds a solution to this problem. That doesn't necessarily mean the Performance Commerce brand stocks the items (unprofitably). It might mean that the Performance Commerce brand has YouTube videos to help the customer fix the lights. It might mean that the Performance Commerce brand links customers to Electricians who can fix the problem. It might mean the Performance Commerce brand works with Influencers who help identify alternate solutions.

Here's an example of Performance Commerce in restaurants (click here).

In 2022, once we move past the pandemic but find ourselves in a changed world, we'll count on Performance Commerce brands to solve problems.

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