November 16, 2016

Copy / Point of View

Received a Talbots catalog ... randomly opened it to page 72, where I observed Item L:
  • L. Bead Cluster Necklace.
  • 18 1/4" long. Ivory/Gold. L72649 $99.
Upon visiting the website, here's what we get to see when we look for L72649 at $99.


There are four things worth pointing out.
  1. The item is $59.40 online ... $99.00 in catalog. So the item probably isn't selling well.
  2. The "Point of View" Talbots wishes to communicate is 30% off or 40% off. 
  3. The copy for this item is different online than in catalog.
  4. The copy describes the item.
I have a lot of e-commerce clients.

There is a big difference between e-commerce brands and traditional catalogers, when it comes to copy.
  1. Catalog copy is designed to describe the item.
  2. E-commerce copy is designed to describe the customer.
This slide is from my Customer Acquisition presentation in 2015. Look at the copy.


I'll quote the copy here:
  • "There he is. Overseeing the state of affairs at all celebrations of this sweet sweet nation. Krumping somewhere between heaping piles of charcoal and the cooing of bald eagles is where you will find this dude."
Here is the copy from Talbots:
  • Catalog Copy = L. Bead Cluster Necklace. 18 1/4" long. Ivory/Gold. L72649 $99.
  • Online Copy = "Eye-catching clusters of gold and ivory beads round the neck in a collar-like fashion for maximum impact with minimal effort. With a bib silhouette and neutral color scheme, this intricately crafted necklace is simply breathtaking and embodies an understated elegance that provides timeless allure. Make it a set with the matching Pearl Cluster Earrings"
Can you see the difference?

The cataloger describes the item.

The e-commerce brand describes the customer. Low cost customer acquisition programs typically describe the customer ... that's how they attract the customer. The merchant and the creative professional work together to describe how the merchandise fits into the life of the customer.

A clearly articulated point of view is so important. Here, we can see the difference in point of view. Talbots has a point of view, make no mistake about it. Can you see how the point of view differs from Chubbies? 

Both points of view can work. One requires more paid advertising (catalogs, paid search) to fuel conversion. One fosters more word of mouth (which is risky).

Now give your copy some thought. What point of view does your copy communicate to the customer?


P.S.: Here's something for you to consider ... Instagram followers. To me, Instagram is the exhaust produced by great imagery and great copy. Followers aren't the end game ... they are the metric that tells you something about how much customers love creative / imagery / copy.

Which brand is more well-known?

Which brand has vibrant creative / imagery / copy that creates word of mouth that results in low-cost customer acquisition?