March 13, 2013

Creative - Part 3

We started with QVC, a Judy-centric business.  We moved to J. Jill, a Jennifer-centric business.  Now let's look at a couple of businesses that have a different style of presentation.

Here's Pacsun:



You can rotate through several stories - here's another one.



Ok, here's the demographic story from Quantcast (click here).  Who is the customer?
  1. Judy, Average Age = 60.
  2. Jennifer, Average Age = 44.
  3. Jasmine, Average Age = 28.
  4. Jadyn, Average Age = 12.
This is somewhere between Jasmine and Jadyn, right?

Notice that we're still focusing on stories, but some of the links divert us from merchandise, to content / connection.  There's a link to the blog, or you can log in to the site via Facebook (at which time, lots of data is being shared between the brand, Facebook, and friends of the person visiting the site).



Sure, it's a clean presentation - but look at what's going on here - on my first visit, they want information from me, so that they can stay in touch with me (or collect information that they can mine in a Big Data environment).  This style of relationship building is not readily apparent among most Judy-centric brands, and is found infrequently among Jennifer-centric brands.

What about Aeropostale, shifting even further to Jadyn:


This is my first visit - and again, very clean presentation, very "brand centric" and not "merchandise centric" ... but the immediate request for data, so that Aeropostale can communicate with me.  Below the fold, you find opportunities to connect via text, email, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

As you migrate from Judy (merchandise-centric) to Jennifer (story-centric) to Jasmine/Jadyn (relationship centric), you see themes, don't you?

Tomorrow, we'll talk about the ramifications of these themes.