September 14, 2010

Digital Profiles Part C: An Introduction To Each Profile

Well, we've made it to the fun part of the project!!

In Part A, we collected the data necessary to create Digital Profiles.

In Part B, we executed a whole bunch of geeky math, math that was necessary to create each Digital Profile.

In Part C, I introduce a table that outlines the composition of each Digital Profile.

Here's how we read the table. Each row represents an attribute. Each column represents one of the sixteen Digital Profiles. Each cell represents the actual value of that metric for the customers in the Digital Profile. Any cell that is shaded is a cell that has an above-average value for that metric. The shadings are used to name each Digital Profile.

And in case you didn't notice, it isn't easy to come up with names for Digital Profiles! You're free to come up with whatever names you feel are appropriate ... what matters is how the Digital Profiles are used, not what the Digital Profiles are named.

Take a look at the Online Buyers row. Notice that the first eight Digital Profiles all have above-average values for Online Buyers, whereas the final eight Digital Profiles are virtually absent of Online Buyer. This happened because the first factor was heavily weighted toward online buyers. So, in our Digital Profile analysis, we'll want to see how the first eight Digital Profiles perform in comparison with the final eight Digital Profiles.

Take a look at the Online, E-Mail, Search, Social, and Mobile rows. You'll see that across the first eight Digital Profiles, there is a continuum of digital "savvy" ... Social and Mobile in the first two profiles, then Social drops off, then E-Mail drops off. This will be interesting to monitor over time as Social and Mobile increasingly replace Online and E-Mail as complementary channels.

Up Next: Four posts, with the description of four Digital Profiles each.